Sunday, April 14, 2013

Humates Help Your Lawn!

If you are experiencing chronic turf problems including fungus, thatch or thin, weak grass, consider using a humic acid. 


One way to make your lawn healthier is to add humic acids on a regular basis. Humates come from leonardite coal, which is mined in North Dakota.  All soils will benefit from humic acid, but soils with high clay content and/or low organic levels will show the most change. Think of humic acid as an organic bio-stimulant for your soil. Using humic acid can help restore your lawn’s root system. Healthy root systems increase efficient water and nutrient uptake. Healthier root systems also decrease stress levels on the plant, including grass. Less stress equals less sustibility to things like fungus. The above illustration is an actual customer's lawn, before aeration and adding humic acid. Two months later the lawn had recovered to the extent you see on the right. You can get the benefits of humic acid in your own lawn  by applying Natural Guard Soil Activator.

Still have questions?  Don't hesitate to ask! Comment, call, stop by, Facebook us, etc. etc.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

220+ Varieties of Spring Planting Bulbs!

The Flower Bin has got some amazing bulbs to plant this spring...over 220 varieties of them!  Our Front-End Manager, Jeanette, points out just a handful of exciting and unique kinds that we have.


Let's start with two neat types of lilies that we have.  The first one is called Broken Heart.  It is a double fuchsia pink and white bloom.  The plant grows about 36-48 inches tall and has very fragrant flowers.  This is a perennial variety, which means you do not have to dig them up come this fall...they can overwinter and come back the following year.

The other Lilly that Jeanette points out that is very unique is a Double Tiger Lily.  These bold orange blooms, dusted with black dots are stunning!  They grow to around 48 inches tall, so they make a perfect back border for your garden, or look amazing placed up against white fences.  The Double Tiger has a very fragrant bloom, and just like the Broken Heart is a perennial variety.

Lilies, in general, should be planted about 6 inches deep in the soil, and should not be planted in the spring until after the last frost.  You are also going to want to add some compost to the soil to amend our tough Colorado clay.


We also have some very unique Dahlias available to go home with you!  These cool plants are native to Mexico and Central America, and are also Mexico's national flower.  Without searching it, do you remember what the U.S. national flower is?  Comment below.

The first Dahlia Jeanette happily points out is the Que Sera, which is a Powderpuff Dahlia.  Powderpuff Dahlias have a fluffier, puffier bloom than a regular variety.  The reason Que Sera is so unique is because it is a new color for the Powderpuffs... lavender and white!  They grow about 36-48 inches.

The next one to brag about is the Show and Tell Dinner Plate Dahlia.  We are not kidding...the blooms actually get to the size of a dinner plate, or about 12 inches across!  Not only is this just an all-around neat variety, it is also a new color for the Dinner-Plate series.  

Last, but certainly not least  there is Marble Boll, a type of Pompon Dahlia.  These cool blooms are more of a compact ball-shaped Dahlia.  This unique variety is purple and whited striped, which is very unique coloring for a Pompon.   They grow about 36-48 inches tall, and Jeanette says they are just perfect for cut flowers!

Like lilies, Dahlias should be planted about 6 inches deep into the soil.  They do need to be dug up on the fall to be saved for planting the following spring.  To do this wait until the first frost kills off the plant's foliage.  Then, wipe off as much of the soil as possible and store in a cool and dry area.  A brown paper bag filled with some vermiculite usually does the trick.

Well, those are some of the bulbs that we are really excited about, but we have so many other cool ones as well!  From Lilies of the Valley and Gladiolas to Begonias and Canas, we have got you covered.  As always, don't be shy...stop by, comment, or call in if you have questions!